Avant-Garde Japanese Fashion

By Neon Staff | 2014/01/14 - 18:10:49


Love it or hate it? Comment this post here.

Japanese fashion designers changed western fashion in the early 80's. After establishing a solid career in Japan, they came to conquer Paris. And they really did. On that note, the Peabody Essex Museum (PEM) is hosting an exhibition named Future Beauty: Avant-Garde Japanese Fashion from November 16 until January 26, 2014. The exhibition features over 100 dresses by renowned Japanese designers such as Issey Miyake, Rei Kawakubo (Comme des Garçons) and Yohji Yamamoto.

Yohji Yamamoto surprised everyone in 1981 with what the Japanese press had named the "black crow" look, emphasized by the use of a single color. Italian fashion editor Carla Sozzani described Yamamoto's work as “an emotional shock” when she saw it for the first time. "Everything was all Mugler and Montana, kind of big shoulders and a lot of makeup and high heels, so Yohji’s clothes were like a revolution.”

Western fashion was flawless, dresses were colorful, fitted and very detailed. Japanese fashion designers came to challenge that perception of beauty and gender, changing it forever. They introduced the concept of androgyny and minimalism, with simple, almost monastic lines. Monochromatic schemes, asymmetries, loose fits with extreme proportions and intentional flaws became a must.

In 1983, Yamamoto and Kawakubo were the toast of Paris, with their fashion shows being the most difficult to get in. The press named them "the monk and the nun", emphasizing on the simplicity of their black outfits. By the end of the 80's, people were embracing the style changes. Wearing black was a trend and Yamamoto was intensively copied. Japanese minimalism was no longer eared. 
Koji Tatsuno, Autumn/Winter 1993-94
Koji Tatsuno, Autumn/Winter 1993-94, collection of the Kyoto Costume Institute
Taishi Hirokawa
Hiroaki Ohya for Astro Boy by Ohya, Spring/Summer 2004
Hiroaki Ohya for Astro Boy by Ohya, Spring/Summer 2004, collection of the Kyoto Costume Institute
KCI
Yohji Yamamoto for Yohji Yamamoto, Spring/Summer 1995
Yohji Yamamoto for Yohji Yamamoto, Spring/Summer 1995, collection of the Kyoto Costume Institute
Takashi Hatakeyama
Junya Watanabe for Junya Watanabe Comme des Garçons, Autumn/Winter 2009–10
Junya Watanabe for Junya Watanabe Comme des Garçons, Autumn/Winter 2009–10, collection of the Kyoto Costume Institute
KCI
Junya Watanabe for Junya Watanabe Comme des Garçons, Autumn/Winter 2000-01
Junya Watanabe for Junya Watanabe Comme des Garçons, Autumn/Winter 2000-01, collection of the Kyoto Costume Institute
Takashi Hatakeyama
Jun Takahashi for UNDERCOVER, Autumn/Winter 2000/01
Jun Takahashi for UNDERCOVER, Autumn/Winter 2000-01, collection of the Kyoto Costume Institute
Takashi Hatakeyama
Yohji Yamamoto for Yohji Yamamoto, Autumn/Winter 1996-97
Yohji Yamamoto for Yohji Yamamoto, Autumn/Winter 1996-97, collection of the Kyoto Costume Institute
Takashi Hatakeyama
Rei Kawakubo for Comme des Garçons, Autumn/Winter 1983-84
Rei Kawakubo for Comme des Garçons, Autumn/Winter 1983-84, collection of the Kyoto Costume Institute
Masayuki Hayashi
Hiroaki Ohya for Ohya, Spring/Summer 2000
Hiroaki Ohya for Ohya, Spring/Summer 2000, collection of the Kyoto Costume Institute
Masayuki Hayashi
Kosuke Tsumura for Final Home, 2012
Kosuke Tsumura for Final Home, 2012, collection of the Kyoto Costume Institute
Takashi Hatakeyama
Rei Kawakubo for Comme des Garçons, Spring/Summer 1997
Rei Kawakubo for Comme des Garçons, Spring/Summer 1997, collection of the Kyoto Costume Institute
Takashi Hatakeyama
Junya Watanabe for Junya Watanabe Comme des Garçons, Spring/Summer 2000
Junya Watanabe for Junya Watanabe Comme des Garçons, Spring/Summer 2000, collection of the Kyoto Costume Institute
Takashi Hatakeyama
Junya Watanabe for Junya Watanabe Comme des Garçons, Spring/Summer 2002
Junya Watanabe for Junya Watanabe Comme des Garçons, Spring/Summer 2002, collection of the Kyoto Costume Institute
Takashi Hatakeyama
Jun Takahashi for UNDERCOVER, Spring/Summer 2007
Jun Takahashi for UNDERCOVER, Spring/Summer 2007, collection of the Kyoto Costume Institute
Kazuo Fukunaga

MORE SCOPES



0 Comments



By browsing this website, you agree with our use of cookies to improve your online experience. Click here to know more