Inside Break­fast at Tiffany’s Style

By Miss Flick | 2014/08/24 - 13:46:14


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When we talk about Audrey Hepburn, it's inevitable to talk about Break­fast at Tiffany’s. The 1961 movie that was adapted from Truman Capote's novella is an epitome of style and a pop culture reference.

Holly Golightly is Hepburn's most important role ever, maybe because she defined a new concept of femininity, a lot different from 1950s bombshells like Marilyn Monroe or Anita Ekberg. Monroe was actually the first choice to play Holly, but her agent dissuaded her from accepting the role, saying that portraying a Call Girl would not be very good for her (already racy) image. If we think about it, the movie would get a completely different vibe, had Marilyn accepted the role.

The Story goes around a woman trying to make her way in New York. The plot is simple, but the characters are compelling and become the central part of a movie that portrays the melancholy and decadence of Manhattan's emerging society of the 1960s, from the breakfast at dawn scene in front of Tiffany's to the crowded, out of control cocktail party spectacle.

But most of the glamour in Break­fast at Tiffany’s came with the presence of some big names in fashion design. Hubert de Givenchy was, at this point, Hepburn's sole couturier and he designed her entire wardrobe, including the iconic satin black dress that Hepburn wore in front of Tiffany’s. Pauline Trigère created the tailored wardrobe for Emily Eustace Failenson, the wealthy matron portrayed by Patricia Neal. Renowned Edith Head, initially the costume designer for the movie, was having a serious beef with these other designers that were taking her place for leading characters and ultimately she appeared as a costume supervisor in the credits. Some say it was a good revenge for Givenchy, who had previously seen Edith taking credit for his work in the movie "Sabrina" and even winning an Oscar for it.

The fact is that Break­fast at Tiffany’s is really Givenchy's pièce de résistance, the movie that catapulted him to fashion stardom. And Audrey Hepburn? Well, she became an indisputable style icon for generations to come. 
Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany's
Paramount Pictures
Audrey Hepburn and Cat in Breakfast at Tiffany's
Paramount Pictures
Audrey Hepburn and George Peppard in Breakfast at Tiffany's
Paramount Pictures
Audrey Hepburn and George Peppard in Breakfast at Tiffany's
Paramount Pictures
George Peppard, Audrey Hepburn and Patricia Neal in Breakfast at Tiffany's
Paramount Pictures
Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany's
Paramount Pictures
George Peppard and Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany's
Paramount Pictures
Audrey Hepburn and George Peppard in Breakfast at Tiffany's
Paramount Pictures
George Peppard and Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany's
Paramount Pictures
Audrey Hepburn and José Luis de Vilallonga in Breakfast at Tiffany's
Paramount Pictures
Audrey Hepburn and George Peppard in Breakfast at Tiffany's
Paramount Pictures

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1 Comments

  1. Joaninha Maria2014-08-27 11:19:53

    Audrey was really something. Love her style



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